Michigan

Upcoming Elections

2024-07-22 – Registration Deadline (Received by)

Received by Mon Jul 22, 2024

2024-07-27 – Early Voting

From Sat Jul 27, 2024 to Sun Aug 4, 2024

2024-08-02 – Ballot Request Deadline

Request to Receive Blank Ballot by Mail by Fri Aug 2, 2024 5:00PM

2024-08-05 – Ballot Request Deadline (In-Person Request by)

In-Person Request by Mon Aug 5, 2024 4:00PM

2024-08-06 – Ballot Return Deadline (Received by)

Received by Tue Aug 6, 2024 8:00PM

2024-08-06 – Registration Deadline (In-Person Request by)

In-Person Request by Tue Aug 6, 2024

2024-08-06 – Ballot Request Deadline (Emergency Ballot Request To)

Emergency Ballot Request To Tue Aug 6, 2024 4:00PM

Last updated: JANUARY 2024

Voting in Michigan

When You Can Vote

Election Day: Polls are open from 7 AM to 8 PM local time on Election Day, or until the last person in line at 8 PM has voted.

Most of Michigan is in the Eastern Time Zone. Note that the four counties of Dickinson, Gogebic, Iron, and Menominee in the western Upper Peninsula, are in the Central Time Zone.

In Person Before Election Day: In every election, all registered voters in Michigan can vote during the 40 days before Election Day using an absentee ballot at their city or township clerk’s office.

In statewide and federal elections, voters may also cast a regular ballot in person at an early voting site. In statewide and federal elections, early voting must be offered for at least nine consecutive days, beginning on the second Saturday before the election (July 27) and ending on the Sunday before the election (August 4), for at least eight hours each day.                

Communities may also offer early voting for additional days (up to 29 days total), for additional hours, and in additional elections (non-statewide and -federal).                                                   

This flexibility means that the days and hours of early voting sites will not be uniform across the state. Voters should visit mi.gov/vote or contact their city or township clerk for the most up to date information.
From Home Before Election Day: Any Michigan voter can vote before Election Day by absentee ballot. Absentee ballots must be available to all voters beginning 40 days before Election Day. Voters can request an absentee ballot online at mi.gov/vote, by mail, or in person at their city or township clerk’s office. Voters may drop off their completed absentee ballot at their city or township clerk’s office or a secure drop box provided by their clerk by 8 PM on Election Day, or they may mail their absentee ballot to their clerk’s office. For most voters, their absentee ballot must be received by their city or township clerk by 8 PM on Election Day; however, the ballots of military and overseas voters are considered timely received if they are postmarked by Election Day and received within six days after. Information about city and township clerks and drop box locations and hours can be found under the “Your Clerk” tab at mi.gov/vote.

Where You Can Vote

Before Election Day 

  • Early Voting Sites: In all statewide and federal elections, voters may cast a regular ballot in person at an early voting site beginning on the second Saturday before the election through the Sunday before the election. All voters will have at least one early voting site. Voters in some communities, like Detroit and Oakland County, will have more than one site. Voters should visit the Michigan Voter Information Center (mi.gov/vote) to find the location of their early voting site(s). For Detroit, go to https://detroitvotes.org/vote-early/#early to find the voter’s closest early voting site.
  • From Home: Any Michigan voter can vote from home before Election Day by absentee ballot. Voters can return their ballot to their city or township clerk’s office by mail, via a secure drop box provided by their city or township clerk, or in person.
    • Information about city and township clerks and drop box locations and hours can be found under the “Your Clerk” tab at mi.gov/vote. Voters also have the option to take their completed absentee ballot to an early voting site or their polling place on Election Day, check in with the poll workers, and insert it directly into the tabulator. (Voters in Detroit cannot insert their completed absentee ballot into a tabulator at their polling place on Election Day.)
  • Clerk’s Office or Satellite Clerk’s Office: Any Michigan voter can vote before Election Day by absentee ballot at a clerk’s office or satellite office.

On Election Day

  • Polling Place: Voters registered to vote where they currently live must vote at their assigned polling place on Election Day.
    • The voter can locate their polling place by visiting mi.gov/vote, clicking on “your voter information” and entering the required information.
  • Same Day Registration and Voting at the Clerk’s Office or Satellite Clerk’s Office: Voters who need to register to vote or update their registration on Election Day must visit their city or township clerk’s office (or satellite office) to register. After registering, the voter may either vote by absentee ballot at the clerk’s office during the same visit or go to their polling place to vote, if there’s time.
  • Election Day Vote Centers: Some communities will have Election Day Vote Centers at which voters will be able to register to vote and vote a regular ballot that can be tabulated on site.
    • Voters should visit mi.gov/vote or contact their city or township clerk to find out if their community has an Election Day Vote Center.
Registering to Vote

Online: More than 14 days before Election Day, Michigan residents with a valid Michigan driver’s license or state ID may register to vote (or update their voter registration) online at this link.  If a voter attempts to register to vote online within 14 days of Election Day, the Secretary of State’s office will notify the voter that they must register in person to be eligible to vote in the upcoming election.

By Mail: Voters may mail a completed voter registration application to their city or township clerk postmarked 15 days or more before Election Day. Federal law requires some voters who register to vote by mail to provide some form of identification prior to voting for the first time. See “Identification Requirements” for more information. 

The voter registration application in English, Arabic, Bengali, Dari Farsi, Korean, Spanish, and large print can be found here

In Person: More than 14 days before Election Day, voters may register in person at their city or township clerk’s office (or satellite office), county clerk’s office, at a Secretary of State Branch Office, or at any designated state agency that provides public assistance or services to people with disabilities. Voters may also register to vote through a voter registration drive.

Beginning 14 days before Election Day through 8 PM on Election Day, voters may only register to vote (or update their registration) in person at their city or township clerk’s office, and they must provide proof of residency. Proof of residency is a document that includes the voter’s name and current address. Paper or electronic copies of any of the following documents will work:

  • A Michigan driver’s license or state ID card;
  • A utility bill;
  • A bank statement;
  • A paycheck;
  • A government check; or
  • Any other government document.

Students from Michigan attending school in Michigan can register to vote at their school or home address in Michigan. 

Students from Michigan attending school outside of Michigan can register to vote at their home address in Michigan.  

Students who are not from Michigan but are attending school in Michigan can register to vote at their school address in Michigan.

If a voter has a Michigan driver’s license or state ID card, and they are registered to vote in Michigan, their voter registration address and the address associated with their ID must be the same. This means that if a voter changes their address for one, it will automatically change their address for the other. The Secretary of State will mail them a sticker with their new address to place on their license or ID card.

Voters can check to see whether they’re registered at their current address at mi.gov/vote by clicking on “your voter information” and entering the required information.

Residency Requirement: To be eligible to vote, a voter must be a Michigan resident and a resident of their city or township for at least 30 days by Election Day, regardless of when they vote.

Pre-Registration: An individual may pre-register to vote if they are:

  • At least 16 but less than 17-1/2 years of age
  • A citizen of the United States
  • A resident of Michigan
  • A resident of the city or township in which they are applying for pre-registration 

Individuals may pre-register using any method of registration available for voter registration (online, by mail, or in-person).  An application for registration by someone meeting the criteria for pre-registration will be treated as an application to pre-register to vote.

An individual who is pre-registered to vote will automatically become a registered voter when they reach 17-1/2 years of age, and they will be eligible to vote in the first election occurring on or after they turn 18 years of age. As long as the voter will be 18 by Election Day, they are eligible to use any method of voting (early voting, absentee voting, or Election Day voting).

Early Voting and Voting by Absentee Ballot

How to Request an Absentee Ballot     

If a voter signed up for the “Permanent Mail Ballot List” in May 2023 or later, the voter will automatically be sent an absentee ballot in the mail for each election.      

If a voter has not signed up for the permanent mail ballot list, there are many ways they can request an absentee ballot. 

Online:

Currently, if a voter has a Michigan driver’s license or state ID, the voter can complete the online application at mi.gov/vote by clicking on “Apply for an absentee ballot online.” 

Voters with disabilities may apply for an accessible electronic absentee ballot online at mi.gov/vote by clicking on “Voters with disabilities” and then “Apply online for an accessible electronic absent voter ballot.” After the voter submits their application, their local clerk will email them an accessible ballot that they can complete on an electronic device using their own assistive technology.

Print Application:

     Voters can also obtain a paper application, sign it using their official signature, and submit it to their city or township clerk by mail, email, fax, in person, or using a secure drop box provided by their clerk. If the voter needs help returning their application, they can request a member of their immediate family or an individual living in their household return their application on their behalf. If that is not possible, the voter can request any Michigan registered voter to deliver the application on their behalf. The person assisting the voter must sign the “Certificate of Authorized Registered Elector Returning Absent Voter Ballot Application” in Section 5 of the application.

The voter can download an application (in English, Arabic, Bengali, Dari/Farsi, Spanish, or large print) from the Michigan

Voter Information Center (mi.gov/vote) or may call their city or township clerk and ask that an application be mailed to them. The voter may also use an application for an absentee ballot mailed to the voter by the Secretary of State, their clerk, a political party, or another civic engagement organization.

The voter can also get the application at the clerk’s office, complete it there, and—if it is within 40 days of the election—receive their absentee ballot immediately. 

If the voter would like to have an absentee ballot mailed to them, it is strongly encouraged that they submit their request no later than two weeks prior to Election Day, so that they’ll have enough time to receive their ballot, complete it, and return it to their city or township clerk by the deadline. 

How to Return the Completed Absentee Ballot     

The voter should fill out the ballot, place it in the envelope provided, and sign the outside of the envelope with the voter’s official signature where indicated. 

Unless the voter is serving in the military or living overseas, the voter’s completed absentee ballot must be received by their city or township clerk by 8 PM on Election Day. If the voter is going to mail the ballot, the state of Michigan recommends that the voter do so at least 14 days prior to Election Day. The voter also may hand-deliver the ballot to their city or township clerk’s office or a drop box provided by their city or township clerk or have an immediate family member or person from their household deliver it for them. The voter can find the location of their clerk’s office and ballot drop box(es) on the Michigan Voter Information Center: mi.gov/vote. If the voter cannot return their ballot using any of the above methods and their ballot is located in their city or township of residence, they can request it be picked up by calling their city or township clerk by 5 p.m. on Aug. 2 (for the Aug. 6 primary election) or 5 p.m. on Nov. 1 (for the Nov. 5 general election). 

Voters also have the option to bring their completed absentee ballot to their early voting site or assigned polling location, check in with the poll workers, and insert it directly into the tabulator. (Detroit voters cannot insert their completed absentee ballots into a tabulator at their assigned polling place on Election Day.)

If the voter is a military or overseas voter, their ballot must be postmarked by Election Day and received by their city or township clerk within six days of the election.

If this is the voter’s first time voting in Michigan and the voter registered to vote through the mail or a voter registration drive, the voter may need to provide some documentation to their local clerk before voting absentee. See “Identification Requirements” for more information. 

Early Voting

In statewide and federal elections, every registered voter in Michigan has the right to vote early in person at an early voting site.

Where to Vote Early: 

Voters may cast a ballot at their assigned early voting site(s), which may be located in their city or township or in a neighboring community. Voters should be able to look up their assigned early voting site(s) up to 60 days prior to Election Day at mi.gov/vote or they may contact their city or township clerk.

When Voters May Vote Early:

The early voting period for all statewide and federal elections must begin no later than the second Saturday before Election Day and end the Sunday before the election. Early voting sites must be open for at least eight hours each day during this mandatory early voting period. However, under Michigan law, communities can provide up to 29 days of early voting and may offer extended hours. Communities may also offer early voting in non-statewide and -federal elections. 

During each day of the early voting period, eligible voters waiting in line when an early voting site closes have the right to stay in line and cast a ballot.

Requirements for Early Voting:

The requirements for voting early are the same as voting at the polls. Like in-person voting on Election Day, a voter may cast a ballot at an early voting site even if the voter does not have a valid photo ID with them. Voters without an acceptable photo ID or who forgot to bring a photo ID can still cast their ballot after verifying their identity by signing a simple form called an affidavit.

Early voting sites do not offer voter registration; therefore, voters should ensure that they are registered to vote at their current address prior to visiting an early voting site. However, if an early voting site is located at a clerk’s office or satellite office, voters may register to vote on site at the clerk’s office and cast a ballot at the early voting site. 

Early Voting if the Voter Requested an Absentee Ballot:

Voters who have received but not submitted an absentee ballot and who would prefer to vote early in person have several options. 

  • First, the voter can bring their completed absentee ballot to their early voting site, check in with the poll workers, and insert it directly into the tabulator, or the voter can surrender it and receive a new ballot to complete and submit on site.      
  • Second, if a voter does not have their absentee ballot to surrender, they may sign a statement stating that the ballot was lost or destroyed and will be issued a new ballot to complete and submit at the early voting site.  

Voters who have already submitted their absentee ballot to their clerk but wish to vote in person before Election Day can spoil the ballot and vote in person at the early voting site up until 5 PM on the second Friday before Election Day. After this time, voters will not be allowed to spoil their already submitted absentee ballot (in other words, their absentee ballot will be counted).

At early voting sites, voters insert their completed ballot into a tabulator, just like at a polling place on Election Day. Once a ballot has been inserted into a tabulator, it cannot be traced back to an individual voter. As a result, once a ballot has been inserted into a tabulator, it cannot be changed. Therefore, voters who insert their ballot into a tabulator at an early voting site do not have the ability to spoil their ballot or change their vote.

Election Challengers and Poll Watchers:

Volunteer election challengers and poll watchers may observe the voting process at early voting sites as permitted by Michigan election law.

Identification Requirements

Voter Registration

To register to vote in Michigan you should provide one of the following:

  • Your Michigan Driver’s License Number
  • Your Michigan ID Number

If you do not have these IDs, you may provide:

  • Last Four Digits of your Social Security Number

You can alternatively provide one of these documents when you vote to complete your registration.

If you are registering for the first time by mail and can not be identified by the ID information you provided, you will need to provide proof of residence. Acceptable forms of proof of residence include:

  • Current and Valid Photo ID
  • Valid Michigan Driver’s License except one issued to an individual that is not a United States citizen
  • Government Issued Document that shows your current name and address
  • Michigan Personal ID
  • Current Utility Bill or Pay Check or Bank Statement

You can alternatively show one of these documents when you vote to complete your registration. The identification requirement does not apply if you personally hand deliver the registration form to your clerk’s office, are disabled or eligible to vote under the federal Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Voting Act.

Voting In-Person

If you are registered to vote in Michigan, you are required to show a photo ID to vote; or, you may instead sign an affidavit or similar document. Accepted forms of ID include:

  • Valid Michigan Driver’s License
  • Michigan Personal ID

If you do not have an ID from the above list, in Michigan additional, acceptable forms of ID include:

  • Valid US Passport
  • Out of State Personal ID
  • Valid Military ID
  • Valid Federal Issued ID
  • Valid Student ID
  • Out of State Driver’s License or Non-driver ID
  • Valid ID Issued by another State
  • Valid Tribal ID

NOTE: The information above should also include:

Registration

Individuals in Michigan do not need a photo ID or proof of citizenship to register to vote.  Other means of identification may be required depending on the method and timing of registration. 

To register to vote online, the voter must provide a valid Michigan driver’s license or state ID number. 

If the voter has: (1) never registered to vote in Michigan before, (2) chooses to mail in their registration application or to register at a voter registration drive, and (3) did not provide their Michigan driver’s license number, state ID number, or Social Security number on their application when registering, federal law requires the voter to verify their identity with an acceptable identification. See below for a list of acceptable types of identification. (The federal identification requirement for first time Michigan voters choosing registration by mail does not apply if the voter (1) hand-delivers the application to their county, city, or township clerk’s office, (2) is disabled, or (3) is eligible to vote under the federal Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act.) 

If the voter registers to vote in person, the voter will be asked for a photo ID. If they have a valid form of photo ID, they must show it. If they do not have one or do not have one with them, the voter will be asked to sign a simple form and will be allowed to register to vote. 

Valid forms of photo ID include: 

  • Driver’s License or personal ID card issued by Michigan or another state;
  • Federal, state, or local government-issued photo ID;
  • U.S. Passport;
  • Military ID with Photo;
  • Student ID with photo from an educational institution; and 
  • Tribal ID with photo.

If the voter registers to vote between 14 days prior to Election Day and 8 PM on Election Day, the voter will be required to provide “Proof of Residency”. Proof of Residency is a document with the voter’s name and current address in the city or township where the voter lives. Paper or electronic copies of any of the following documents will work:

  • A Michigan driver’s license or state ID card;
  • A utility bill;
  • A bank statement;
  • A paycheck;
  • A government check; or
  • Any other government document.

Voting 

Photo ID is not required to vote in person or by mail in Michigan. If the voter has a photo ID, they should bring it with them and provide it to the poll worker or clerk staff to make the process go faster. 

Voters will be asked for photo ID when they go to vote. If they have a valid form of photo ID, they must show it. If they do not have a valid form of photo ID, or do not have it with them, they can sign a simple form explaining that they do not have a photo

ID. The voter will then be permitted to vote, and the vote will be counted on Election Day.

First time voters who registered through the mail or a voter registration drive may need to provide some documentation to vote. Electronic or paper copies of any of the following will work:

  • Photo ID with the voter’s name and picture (regardless of the address or if it has an address):
  • Driver’s license or personal ID card from any state
  • High school or college ID 
  • Passport
  • Military or federal, state or local government-issued photo ID or
  • Tribal ID card with photo.
  • A non-photo ID with the voter’s name and address on it:
  • Utility bill
  • Bank statement
  • Paycheck stub
  • Government check or
  • Any other government document.

Casting a Provisional Ballot

A voter who is in the correct precinct but is not listed on the voter registration list and does not have a photo ID with their current address can ask the poll workers to call the clerk to verify their registration. If their registration cannot be verified, they must be offered a provisional ballot if:

  • The voter cannot present a voter registration receipt; and
  • The voter refuses or cannot go to their city or township clerk’s office to register and vote.

If the voter in this situation is provided a provisional ballot, it will go into a sealed envelope, and the clerk will review it after Election Day to determine if the voter voted in the proper precinct.

The voter has six days after Election Day to go to the clerk’s office to provide appropriate residency or identification documents to show that the voter is registered to vote.

If You Have Moved Within Your State

Moving within the Same City or Township

If the voter has moved within the same city or township where they are registered, they may vote at their old polling place one last time, or they may choose to register to vote at their new address.

Moving to a Different City or Township

If the voter moved to a different city or township more than 60 days before Election Day, they must register to vote at their new address.

If the voter moved to a different city or township in Michigan between 60 and 30 days of Election Day, they may vote in their old city or township (in person or from home by absentee ballot) one last time or at their new polling place after updating their registration address. 

If the voter has moved to a different city or township in Michigan less than 30 days before Election Day, they must vote in their old city or township since they will not meet the 30-day residency requirement to register to vote in their new city or township.

If You Are in the Military or Are an Overseas Voter

Voting Military

Service members and their dependents may register and request a ballot using the federal voter registration/ballot request form (“FPCA”). You will have the following identification options when completing the form:

  • U.S. State or Territory or District Issued ID
  • Option to Indicate that you do not have the Requested ID
  • Last 4 Digits of your Social Security Number

Voting Overseas

U.S. citizens living overseas may register and request a ballot using the overseas voter registration/ballot request form. You will have the following identification options when completing the form:

  • U.S. State or Territory or District Issued ID
  • Option to Indicate that you do not have the Requested ID
  • Last 4 Digits of your Social Security Number

Military and other overseas citizens may use the standard procedure for absentee voting by mail, but there are also special provisions for members of the U.S. Armed Forces and merchant marine, commissioned corps of the Public Health Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with family members of all these groups, and other citizens who reside outside the United States (together these groups are called UOCAVA voters).

Register to Vote  

Go to the Federal Voting Assistance Program (www.fvap.gov) to download and complete a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA).

Requirements: The following information is required when completing the FPCA:

  • Full name
  • Date of birth
  • Registration address and current address
  • Driver’s license or state ID or the last 4 digits of Social Security number. If you do not have any of these numbers you must enter in Section 6: “I do not have a Social Security number or Michigan-issued ID number.” 

Signed and completed FCPAs must be received by a voter’s local clerk by 2 p.m. on the Saturday before Election Day.

Receiving an Absentee Ballot

The FPCA can also be used to obtain an absent voter ballot by email, fax, or regular mail. 

Each year, go to the Federal Voting Assistance Program; download an FPCA; complete and submit by postal mail, fax, or scan and email to the voter’s city or township clerk based on their Michigan home residence.

Only those voters covered under the UOCAVA are eligible to use the FCPA and receive an absentee ballot by email or fax. Covered voters include:

  • A member of a uniformed service on active duty who is absent from his or her city or township of residence. (Voter can be inside or outside the United States.)
  • A member of the Merchant Marine who, by reason of service in the Merchant Marine, is absent from their city or township of residence. (The voter can be inside or outside the United States.)
  • A spouse or dependent of a member of a uniformed service or a member of the Merchant Marine who, by reason of the active duty or service of the member, is absent from his or her city or township of residence. (The voter can be inside or outside the United States.)
  • A civilian voter who is outside the United States and is eligible to vote in Michigan.
  • A member of the National Guard activated on state orders

Absentee ballots of military voters and voters living overseas can count if they are postmarked by Election Day and received by the voter’s city or township clerk within six days of the election.

If You Have a Conviction or are in Jail or Prison

Yes, a voter with a criminal conviction may vote if they are not currently serving a sentence in jail or prison.

A voter may register and vote if they:

  • Are in jail but have not been sentenced
  • Are serving a sentence but are not in jail or prison
  • Are on probation or parole but are not in jail or prison or
  • Served their sentence and are no longer in jail or prison.

Questions about voting in Michigan?

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